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Bike Stuff: This Month's Latest Discoveries

Bike Stuff: This Month's Latest Discoveries

Each month, our friends over at Cyclr.com will take you by the hand and guide you around their latest discoveries in the cycling world. Everything from new brands, designers and makers through to some ingenious inventions and ideas.

Bikes have drastically changed the way we navigate and pedal our way through cities, facilitating how we get from A to B. We’ve come a long way since the draisine was invented in the early 19th century, we should be proud. From bottle carriers to bicycle boots, Cyclr brings you this month's bike discoveries.

Buca Boot

With a car, you go shopping without having the dilemma of wondering where all your new gear is going to go. So what do cyclists do? The simple fix is to add a boot to your bike, right? The Buca Boot carries everything from “a pair of shoes to a laptop to a case of beer” apparently. All vital things! The boot is aimed at urban cyclists, so what do you think?

It’s weatherproof and secure, so might actually just work. Also the clever design allows it to expand for bigger loads. The more I see it the more I like it, its pretty niche.

Learn more about the Buca Boot via Kickstarter.com

Review: Wind Blox

Wind-Blox, a nifty innovation born from the USA, is a bicycle safety product that attaches to helmet straps and blocks wind noise while riding. With less noise, riders can also hear voices and the surrounding sounds, providing a more enjoyable ride.

Unassuming, simple and totally brilliant. I want two! Read our hands on review at cyclr.com Learn more about the WindBlox and see the complete collection at Wind- Blox.com

Michaux Saddle Bag

The Michaux Saddle Bag – a small and compact bag for the everyday essentials. More than just a saddle bag, the convertible straps allow wearability for a variety of occasions off the saddle – hence the name Shadow (as in, like a shadow, it will go everywhere with you, wink wink). The interior is just the right size for a wallet, ones makeup and a smartphone. Reflective details add a little cycle chic whilst increasing visibility. Learn more about the Michaux Saddle Bag and many more wonderful hand crafted British-made cycling accessories at Michaux.cc

Crankpump – The invisible tire pump

So believe it or not, it turns out that hollow axle located between the pedal cranks is the perfect size for a bike pump. A CrankPump CO2 Tire Pump. While you’re not going to be able to fit your wallet, phone or traditional looking bike pump in-between your pedal cranks, the new CrankPump CO2 tire pump can pop right inside. Made specifically for the Shimano Hollowtech cranks, you Simply unscrew the existing plastic bolt, screw in CrankPump, and forget about it. Until you get a flat. When that unfortunate day rolls along – flat tyre day – you pull out the CrankPump concealed within the hollow axle, then pull off its two TyreZip levers. These are used to essentially “unzip” the tyre bead from the rim. Once the tube is patched, you re-inflate the tyre by just pressing the business end of the CrankPump up to the valve stem. And boom, consider your tyre inflated and ready to go.

Bike pumps are generally quite annoying, ‘cumbersome’ items. So the idea of having a small pump discreetly nestled a few inches away from my heels definitely sounds appealing. I think I might just make a pledge.

The London-based design team are currently raising funds via Kickstarter to cover production funds. £15 will get you one. However, the single-use 12-gram CO2 canister must be provided by the user – they typically go for less than £1 each.

Learn more about the CrankPump over at kickstarter.com

The Bike Porter by Copenhagen Parts

Born from a research project for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, New York-based design studio NR 2154 and Danish company Goodmorning Technology came together to create an integrated bike scheme for the city. The studios set about creating a bike built for the demands of city riding. During their initial research, the designers discovered that the baskets on public bicycles were often the first part to be damaged. Their solution would be to hybridize the handlebar and the basket into one comprehensive part otherwise known as the Bike Porter. By integrating the handlebars and a basket, the Bike Porter enables one to maintain a streamlined look with the added benefit of storage. Made of heat- treated aluminum alloy, the Bike Porter is designed to be both lightweight and strong. Designed with city riding in mind, the frontal basket can hold up to 30 pounds, the perfect size for your groceries or your gym bag. Built to be easily affixed to any bike, the porter can be attached to any two-part stem. Learn more about the Bike Porter and Copenhagen Parts at copenhagenparts.com

Route Clothing

Everything about Route is people orientated. They are environmentally conscientious and ethical in their approach to clothing and business. They use sustainable materials, from fair trade cotton to bamboo. Based in Glasgow, they pretty much make everything they can in the UK and love all things to do with cycling culture. Why not check them out? routeclothing.com

London Bike Cartel Knightsbridge

Has affordable ever looked so good? Built with heart and style, London Bike Cartel bicycles come straight from the streets of London. The Knightsbridge Matt black frame with matt black deep dish machined rims is coined 'The Knightsbridge'. Learn more about London Bike Cartel

See.Sense. Front and Rear Set

See. Sense, a Northern Ireland born brand bringing a digital upgrade to bike tech. The original See.Sense lights were designed in response to a problem faced by See.Sense founder Philip McAleese as a daily cycle commuter. Frustrated at how invisible cyclists were, See.Sense was born. More than just your average blinking bike light, the See.Sense is an intelligent bike light that is completely responsive to your environment, commanding attention in the times when you need it most. The light will flash both brighter and more rapidly in situations like low light areas, approaching headlights, heavy traffic and more. Using advanced sensor technology; the See.Sense will make you a hard target to miss on the road, drastically reducing the chances of an accident during nighttime bicycle commuting. The fact that the device only increases its output when necessary also makes it extremely energy efficient, doing away with the need for a large external battery pack. Learn more about the See Sense light at Seesense.cc

UCI WORLD TOUR MINIMALIST RACE POSTER

Rebecca J Kaye is a talented illustrator and printmaker, hailing from Wales but now based in beautiful Edinburgh. Cycling and the outdoors permeate her work, which is characterised by simple visuals, strong concepts and plenty of colour. Her imagination, especially in relation to cycle related shapes, is uniquely fun and bold. The UCI World Tour Minimalist Rae poster pays homage to the great world tour. The poster is also full colour lithography printed in Scotland on 165GSM GF Smith Paper. If you want a gift or a piece of art for your personal collection, discover at rebeccajkaye.com

Paniagua EPO Coffee

Controversially named caffeine for cyclists. The name Paniagua comes from the Spanish term 'pan y agua', which translates to 'bread and water' – a phrase used in professional cycling to identify riders who aren't doping. EPO coffee is handcrafted using a cast iron Probat roaster, by award-winning artisans Extract Coffee Roasters. The 100 percent Arabica goods are said to be ethically sourced and feature a blend of Brazilian Daterra and Costa Rican beans honey-processed to deliver a sweeter and fruitier taste – "sweeter than a solo breakaway on the Ventoux" as Paniagua put it. Learn more at paniagua.myshopify.com

The Cyclr Editorial Series is exclusive to Cyclescheme and produced by Cyclr.com – Cyclr is a lifestyle destination that delivers the latest on indie cycling brands, and bike design and innovation. Read more Cyclr articles at Cyclr.com

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