Round Up: 5 of the best Folding bikes

Cyclescheme, 23.05.2017

Round Up: 5 of the best Folding bikes

A bike that folds to the size of a suitcase can go anywhere with you: on the train, in the car, into the office or an upstairs flat… Here are five good ones.


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Tern Link D8

You can buy fold-in-half bikes with 20 inch wheels for half the price but the Link D8 is worth the extra. It’s more portable. At 12.1kg, it’s 2-3kg lighter, a difference you’ll feel crossing a station footbridge, and it can be rolled on its wheels when folded. Its unusual N-fold means it’s compact: 79x72x38cm. It rides better, thanks to robust hinges with minimal flex and 50mm Schwalbe Big Apple tyres that will float over bumps and holes. Eight-speed gearing will get you up most hills and V-brakes will stop you effectively coming down.

Tern Link D8

RRP: £670
Cyclescheme Price: £502.50*

Dahon Mu Uno 20w 

If you’ll be using a folder for a few flat miles between the station and the office, you don’t need many gears. The Mu Uno has just one. It’s simpler and lighter; the whole bike weighs in at 11.4kg. It also minimises maintenance, as there’s little to go wrong. You don’t even need to oil the drivetrain as it employs a belt drive. As there’s no oil, none can get on your clothes - or the office carpet. Despite using the larger of the two 20-inch wheel standards (ISO 451), the Mu Uno folds to a compact 78x66x26cm package.

Dahon Mu Uno 20w

RRP: £800
Cyclescheme Price: £600*  
 

Brompton S2L

The iconic Brompton is available in a range of a la carte configurations. For flatter towns and cities, the 2-speed model should be sufficient. It’s lighter than the hub-geared models, tipping the scales at 11kg when fitted with the essential mudguards and front luggage block. Ride quality is fine for shorter journeys, and better than you’d imagine from a bike with 16-inch wheels. But portability is its ace card: the Brompton’s fold is the one by which all others are judged. It packs down to 58.5x56.5x27cm in seconds, small enough to stash between the seats on a train.

Brompton S2L

RPP: £950
Cyclescheme Price: £712.50*

Birdy World Sport

At 79x61x36cm and 11.9kg, this entry-level Birdy is good rather than excellent when it comes to portability – small enough to go as luggage on a UK train but bulky beside a Brompton. Unfolded, it excels. The ride quality is outstanding for a bike with 18-inch wheels. There’s no hinge, and thus no flex, in the main frame, and the front and rear wheels benefit from 30-40mm of elastomer suspension. It’s comfortable and composed; you could ride it all day. The only downside is that there aren’t many UK retailers.

Birdy World Sport

RRP: £1169
Cyclescheme Price: £919*

Airnimal Joey Sport

Every Airnimal, including the Joey Sport, is not so much a folder as a conventional bike that packs down for travel. Given 5-10 minutes, it will fit into an 87x66x35cm Airnimal Traveller Case (£279) for flying, while its ‘first fold’ takes only a minute and gets it to about 98x85x35cm. That’s small enough for a train’s end-of-carriage luggage rack, although as the wheels are 24 inches rather than 20 it counts as a bike rather than luggage. So be nice to the guard. On the plus side, bigger wheels give it the ride of a normal bike. It’s 11kg.

Airnimal Joey Sport

RRP: £1299
Cyclescheme Price: £1,049*


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